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Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

This indicator shows the salmonellosis incidence rate in cases per 100,000 population.

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

13.4
12.0
Comparison: TN State Value 

12.0

cases/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2013

County: Davidson

Categories: Health / Food Safety, Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
Technical Note: The regional value is compared to the Tennessee state value.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2014

Why is this important?

Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate : Time Series

2007: 9.8 2008: 12.6 2009: 11.2 2010: 11.1 2011: 9.8 2012: 13.6 2013: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Gender

Female: 10.0 Male: 14.1 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 2.2 Other: 144.5 White: 3.9 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

Comparison: Prior Value 

12.0

cases/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2013

County: Davidson

Categories: Health / Food Safety, Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were not taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2014

Why is this important?

Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate : Time Series

2007: 9.8 2008: 12.6 2009: 11.2 2010: 11.1 2011: 9.8 2012: 13.6 2013: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Gender

Female: 10.0 Male: 14.1 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 2.2 Other: 144.5 White: 3.9 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

Target Not Met
Comparison: Healthy People 2020 Target 

12.0

cases/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2013

County: Davidson

Healthy People 2020 Target: 11.4 cases/100,000 population
Categories: Health / Food Safety, Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2014

Why is this important?

Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate : Time Series

2007: 9.8 2008: 12.6 2009: 11.2 2010: 11.1 2011: 9.8 2012: 13.6 2013: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Gender

Female: 10.0 Male: 14.1 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 2.2 Other: 144.5 White: 3.9 Overall: 12.0

cases/100,000 population